What Was the Original Purpose of the Articles of Confederation

What Was the Original Purpose of the Articles of Confederation


On November 15, 1777, the Continental Congress passed the Articles of Confederation, the first constitution of the United States. However, the Articles of Confederation were not ratified by the thirteen states until March 1, 1781. The articles created a loose confederation of sovereign states and a weak central government that left most of the power to state governments. The need for a stronger federal government quickly became evident and eventually led to the Constitutional Convention in 1787. The current Constitution of the United States replaced the Articles of Confederation on March 4, 1789. In the 1760s and early 1770s, North American settlers increasingly came into conflict with British imperial tax and border policy. When repeated protests did not affect British politics and instead led to the closure of Boston Harbor and the declaration of martial law in Massachusetts, colonial governments sent delegates to a Continental Congress to coordinate a colonial boycott of British goods. When fighting broke out in Massachusetts between American settlers and British forces, the Continental Congress worked with local groups that were originally supposed to pass the boycott to coordinate resistance against the British. British officials in the colonies found themselves increasingly challenged by informal local governments, although loyalist sentiment remained strong in some areas. The United States in Congress is also the last resort on appeal in all disputes and disputes that currently exist or may arise later between two or more States regarding borders, jurisdiction or other grounds; which authority is always exercised in the following way.

Considering that on the fifteenth November of the year of our Lord, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-seven and seventy-seven and in the second year of American independence, the delegates of the United States of America gathered in Congress approved certain articles of the Confederacy and perpetual union between the states of New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, in the following words, namely: In addition to improving their existing association, the records of the Second Continental Congress show that the need for a declaration of independence was closely linked to the requirements of international relations. The 7. In June 1776 Richard Henry Lee introduced a resolution before the Continental Congress declaring the colonies independent; At the same time, he called on Congress to decide to “take the most effective steps to form foreign alliances” and to prepare a Confederate plan for the newly independent states. .

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